Employment Bulletin January 2020

In this edition;

  • What the Queen's Speech means for Employment and Immigration Legislation
  • Statutory employment law changes to watch out for in 2020
  • Employment Status, Employment Appeal Tribunal considers whether the right to provide a substitution to perform work meant a delivery driver was not a worker - Stuart Delivery Ltd v Augustine
  • Employment Appeal Tribunal confirms that a separate investigatory hearing is not always needed in a disciplinary process - Sunshine Hotel v Goddard
  • Samira Ahmed wins equal pay claim against BBC in the Employment Tribunal - Samira Ahmed v BBC
What the Queen's Speech means for Employment and Immigration Legislation

At the opening of Parliament on the 19th of December 2019, the Queen set out details of the new legislation which the Government intends to introduce, with further detail being provided by the Government in the form of briefing notes. Within the legislative programme for the new Parliamentary session are changes to UK employment and immigration law.

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Statutory employment law changes to watch out for in 2020

In addition to the employment and Brexit legislation announced in the Queens Speech, outlined here, 2020 is set to be a busy year for employment law changes, with some key developments outlined below.

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Employment Status - Stuart Delivery Ltd v Augustine

The Employment Appeals Tribunal (‘EAT’) upheld the decision of the Employment Tribunal (‘ET’) that a substitution clause in a delivery driver’s contract did not deny him worker status.

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EAT confirms that a separate investigatory hearing is not always needed in a disciplinary process - Sunshine Hotel v Goddard

The Employment Appeals Tribunal (‘EAT’) confirms there is no legal requirement to hold a separate investigatory hearing and disciplinary hearing in every case, in order for a dismissal to be fair.

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Samira Ahmed wins equal pay claim against BBC in the Employment Tribunal - Samira Ahmed v BBC

Samira Ahmed, a female television presenter, has won her equal pay claim against her employer, the BBC. Although the case contains no legal developments in this area, the decision highlights the still significant issue of equal pay in the workplace and the possibility of triggering claims.

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The law and practice referred to in this article or webinar has been paraphrased or summarised. It might not be up-to-date with changes in the law and we do not guarantee the accuracy of any information provided at the time of reading. It should not be construed or relied upon as legal advice in relation to a specific set of circumstances.

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