Under Rule 1 of the SRA Transparency Rules, we are required to publish information about prices and services in relation to acting in Employment Tribunal cases for unfair and wrongful dismissal. Please find this information below.

This price guidance does not deal with any either type of case, for example, discrimination cases.

We do not generally deal with cases claiming only wrongful dismissal. Therefore, this information deals with cases involving unfair dismissal which may or may not include a claim of wrongful dismissal.

We normally work on the basis of an hourly rate which varies by the person handling your case. The total cost of the service will vary from case to case so we cannot state a total cost in advance. However, the table below sets out a typical range of costs. Costs include VAT.
The ranges are not fixed fees and actual charges may be more or less than this. Where we work on a fixed fee, the fixed fee is typically 25% greater than the upper range figure.

The timescales below will also vary case by case and will also be significantly affected by how quickly you wish the work to be done, how you respond to requests from us for information, and how the other side deals with the matter. Usually some of the stages will overlap.

How much will my legal fees cost?

Our range of costs for bringing and defending claims for unfair or wrongful dismissal are set out below.

All costs are exclusive of VAT. In other words, VAT will be added to these amounts.

The costs for an individual case can vary widely. Generally, the more complex the cases, the longer they take to deal with and the more expensive they are. The estimated costs are below are for:

  1. a simple case that might take one day to conclude at final hearing, and
  2. a moderately complex case that might take three days to conclude at final hearing.
  3. Very complex cases that might take more than three days to hear.

Simple case: £10,000-£16,000 (including Counsel’s fees – see below)

Moderate case: £20,000-£35,000 (including Counsel’s fees – see below)

Very complex cases: £35,000+

These charges are based an average of the hourly rates of the lawyers likely to be involved in the cases. The individual rates range from £200 to £350 per hour.

Depending on the outcome of the hearing there is a risk that the losing party will pay some, or all of the other party costs.

Many cases link a claim of unfair dismissal to more complex claims of discrimination. Cases that just involve one claim of unfair dismissal are generally simpler than discrimination claims.

Factors that could make an unfair dismissal case more complex, make it take longer to prepare for and to hear and thus costlier are:

  1. Preliminary hearings
  2. If the hearing is postponed
  3. Delays or lack of cooperation on the part of the tribunal, witnesses, Counsel, the other side or yourself in responding or providing instructions
  4. Interlocutory applications, including applications for any form of injunctive relief
  5. If you do not agree to a formal mediation of the dispute
  6. Amendment of court documents is required
  7. If it is necessary to make or defend applications to amend claims or to provide further information about an existing claim
  8. Defending claims that are brought by litigants in person
  9. Making or defending a costs application
  10. Complex preliminary issues such as whether the claimant is an employee
  11. If it is an automatic unfair dismissal claim e.g. if the employee claims they are dismissed after blowing the whistle on their employer
  12. If the case is one of constructive dismissal (where the employee resigns and says they are entitled to do so by reason of the employer’s conduct)
  13. Many witnesses and documents
  14. A separate remedy hearing is required

This is not an exclusive list. The actual cost of the case will depend on your particular case which we will discuss with you.

Disbursements

Disbursements are costs related to your matter that are payable to third parties, such as travel costs, and payments to counsel/barristers.

For a hearing before the employment tribunal, you may incur the fees of a barrister. Such fees vary widely usually depending on how senior they are. We would discuss your needs with you. Typically, counsel’s fees for a simple case might be around £1,000 and for a moderate case, around £5,000.

Key stages

The fees set out above cover all of the work in relation to the following key stages of a claim:

  1. Discussion with you to consider the case generally. Advise you of any steps which must be taken to protect your position
  2. Acas mandatory conciliation
  3. Review all information and documents
  4. Carrying out a full assessment of all the material and information gathered.  Provide a preliminary opinion on liability and quantum
  5. Provide a schedule of loss or counter-schedule of loss
  6. Consider and advise as to the need to obtain expert opinion
  7. Consider and advise on whether it might be appropriate to pursue any pre-hearing applications against the other side or third party
  8. Consider whether specific request for disclosure or further details of the claim will be required
  9. Consider claim form and draft defence
  10. Consider and complete case management agenda including list of issues
  11. Preparation for and attendance at preliminary hearing
  12. Make any applications as ordered at preliminary hearing
  13. Prepare list of documents to be disclosed in Tribunal
  14. Review disclosed documents from other side
  15. Agree bundle content with the other side
  16. Prepare bundle
  17. Interview witnesses and prepare witness statements assume
  18. Consider witness statements of the other side and take written instructions on same and advise further
  19. Consider any proposals for settlement and obtain your instructions, and put forward any counter-proposal if appropriate.  Continue negotiations if so instructed
  20. Prepare Instructions to Counsel
  21. Liaise with the other side, Counsel and Counsel’s clerk, witnesses and yourself throughout.  Correspondence, e-mails, telephone conversations and meetings
  22. Conference with Counsel
  23. Prepare cast list and chronology
  24. Attend Counsel - assume at one day of hearing
  25. Post hearing conference and learnings

How long will my matter take?

The time that it takes from taking your initial instructions to the final resolution of your matter depends largely on the stage at which your case is resolved. Also, some courts or tribunals deal with cases faster than others. Generally, cases take between 9-18 months. This is just an estimate and we will of course be able to give you a more accurate timescale once we have more information and as the matter progresses.

SRA PRICING INFORMATION FOR INDIVIDUALS

EMPLOYMENT CASES

How much will my legal fees cost?

Our range of costs for bringing claims for unfair or wrongful dismissal are set out below.

All costs are exclusive of VAT. In other words, VAT will be added to these amounts.

The costs for an individual case can vary widely. Generally, the more complex the cases, the longer they take to deal with and the more expensive they are. The estimated costs are below are for:

  1. a simple case that might take one day to conclude at final hearing, and
  2. a moderately complex case that might take three days to conclude at final hearing.
  3. Very complex cases that might take more than three days to hear.

Simple case: £10,000-£16,000 (including Counsel’s fees – see below)

Moderate case: £20,000-£35,000 (including Counsel’s fees – see below)

Very complex cases: £35,000+

These charges are based an average of the hourly rates of the lawyers likely to be involved in the cases. The individual rates range from £200 to £350 per hour.

Depending on the outcome of the hearing there is a risk that the losing party will pay some, or all of the other party costs.

Many cases link a claim of unfair dismissal to more complex claims of discrimination. Cases that just involve one claim of unfair dismissal are generally simpler than discrimination claims.

Factors that could make an unfair dismissal case more complex, make it take longer to prepare for and to hear and thus costlier are:

  1. Preliminary hearings
  2. If the hearing is postponed
  3. Delays or lack of cooperation on the part of the tribunal, witnesses, Counsel, the other side or yourself in responding or providing instructions
  4. Interlocutory applications, including applications for any form of injunctive relief
  5. If you do not agree to a formal mediation of the dispute
  6. Amendment of court documents is required
  7. If it is necessary to make or defend applications to amend claims or to provide further information about an existing claim
  8. Making or defending a costs application
  9. Complex preliminary issues such as whether you are an employee
  10. If it is an automatic unfair dismissal claim e.g. if you are dismissed after blowing the whistle on your employer
  11. If the case is one of constructive dismissal (where you resign and claim that you are entitled to do so by reason of the employer’s conduct)
  12. Many witnesses and documents
  13. If a separate remedy hearing is required

This is not an exclusive list. The actual cost of the case will depend on your particular case which we will discuss with you.

Disbursements

Disbursements are costs related to your matter that are payable to third parties, such as travel costs, and payments to counsel/barristers.

For a hearing before the employment tribunal, you may incur the fees of a barrister. Such fees vary widely usually depending on how senior they are. We would discuss your needs with you. Typically, counsel’s fees for a simple case might be around £1,000 and for a moderate case, around £5,000.

Key stages

The fees set out above cover all of the work in relation to the following key stages of a claim:

  1. Discussion with you to consider the case generally. Advise you of any steps which must be taken to protect your position
  2. Acas mandatory conciliation
  3. Review all information and documents
  4. Carrying out a full assessment of all the material and information gathered.  Provide a preliminary opinion on liability and quantum
  5. Provide a schedule of loss or counter-schedule of loss
  6. Consider and advise as to the need to obtain expert opinion
  7. Consider and advise on whether it might be appropriate to pursue any pre-hearing applications against the other side or third party
  8. Consider whether specific request for disclosure or further details of the claim will be required
  9. Consider claim form and draft defence
  10. Consider and complete case management agenda including list of issues
  11. Preparation for and attendance at preliminary hearing
  12. Make any applications as ordered at preliminary hearing
  13. Prepare list of documents to be disclosed in Tribunal
  14. Review disclosed documents from other side
  15. Agree bundle content with the other side
  16. Prepare bundle
  17. Interview witnesses and prepare witness statements assume
  18. Consider witness statements of the other side and take written instructions on same and advise further
  19. Consider any proposals for settlement and obtain your instructions, and put forward any counter-proposal if appropriate.  Continue negotiations if so instructed
  20. Prepare Instructions to Counsel
  21. Liaise with the other side, Counsel and Counsel’s clerk, witnesses and yourself throughout.  Correspondence, e-mails, telephone conversations and meetings
  22. Conference with Counsel
  23. Prepare cast list and chronology
  24. Attend Counsel - assume at one day of hearing
  25. Post hearing conference and learnings

How long will my matter take?

The time that it takes from taking your initial instructions to the final resolution of your matter depends largely on the stage at which your case is resolved. Also, some courts or tribunals deal with cases faster than others. Generally, cases take between 9-18 months. This is just an estimate and we will of course be able to give you a more accurate timescale once we have more information and as the matter progresses.

Details of our team who will be carrying out the work. Where they may also supervise another lawyer, supervisory experience is given:

Peter Woodhouse

Jean Boyle

Surinder Dhillon

Harriet Broughton

James Barratt